Into The Wild West

 

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Photo by Jimmy Zammar.

In that land we led a free and hardy life, with horse and rifle.

~Teddy Roosevelt

We arrived a week ago in the old western town of Winthrop, Washington in that valley that will be our new home. If you want to say it correctly, its “Warshington.” We are excited to be here but it still feels a bit like we are visiting, rather than living here. Our first weekend, we had friends visit which was a great distraction from all the work that we still need to do on the bus. Plus we could not get into a storage unit for a few days and therefore the bus was full of our belongings (yes, simplicity is a main reason for living in the bus, but we are not about to get rid of all of our camping, backpacking, fishing etc gear) and we needed to clear it out before we could start living in it.

With our friends, we cooked and talked and laughed and hiked up Lookout Mountain. The wildflowers both down here in the valley and up in the mountains are amazing.

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Photo by Jimmy Zammar.

We took in the views of distant snow-capped mountains, drank in the beauty of wildflowers and ultimately our path was blocked by snow so we did not make it all the way to the top.

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Photo by Jimmy Zammar.

A wonderful weekend spent with close friends was the perfect way to begin our new life here in the Methow Valley.


written by David LaFever

Cease to Speak, Perfectly Understood

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Free your mind and your ass will follow.

~George Clinton

The desire to go home that is a desire to be whole, to know where you are, to be the point of intersection of all the lines drawn through all the stars, to be the constellation-maker and the center of the world, that center called love. To awaken from sleep, to rest from awakening, to tame the animal, to let the soul go wild, to shelter in darkness and blaze with light, to cease to speak and be perfectly understood. 

~Rebecca Solnit

 

All great journeys begin in exhaustion. Birth. Death. This. I am exhausted – in part because I did not sleep well last night on a thin air mattress and in part because we have been working so hard of late to make this journey possible.

We tend to think that journeys take us some place else but in fact they take us right back where we started from. Right here, right now. Home.

It has been said that the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. But for us humans, that step is usually preceded by a thought. And that thought with an intention. Actually before and after, like the feet in walking, is impossible to know. For us, I cannot say where this all begin but I do know that it begin with an intention and a vow – to live simpler, more deliberate. To root ourselves in place, community, love and beauty. Love and beauty, perhaps, beyond all else. To find ourselves perfectly and beautifully at home with who we are, where we are and what we are. Rebecca Solnit said that, “The desire to go home (is) a desire to be whole” and to be a “point of intersection.”

I have felt that here on the north coast of California. Our home and our life has been a gathering place, a confluence of children and friends and chickens. It is damn hard to say goodbye to this place, which has seeped into our bones like winter rain, summer fog, incoming tides, and especially the people who have been so kind to us. I only hope I have been able to reciprocate the gifts of friendship, love and laughter that have been given freely to us.

We journey to the north, knowing that “the journey itself is home,” as Basho wrote, to the North Cascades where rivers meet. We hope that our life will continue to be a place where people come together, a confluence, where we may awaken from our sleep or rest from our awakening. May we continue to blaze with light and be sheltered in the darkness!

To our Humboldt friends – a deep bow and a warm hug! Thank you for nourishing our life here, you mean the world to us!


written by David LaFever